Bacon Jam (a.k.a. Oooh-Mommy! Jam)

You know food is going to make you happy when it smiles at you.  (Probably could’ve made a buck selling a smiling egg yolk on eBay, but honey?  There was no way I was walking away from this breakfast.  And even if I did, there were twelve people waiting to take over the job for me this morning.)

My love of bacon has been pretty well documented (proof of my bacon-obsession) but I can honestly tell you that today’s recipe, Bacon Jam,  is the my favorite way I’ve ever eaten it.

I’m just going to say right here -at the beginning- that this is one of the hardest pieces I’ve ever written.  I’ve flogged my brain for hours, but the fact is, there aren’t enough superlatives to describe how core-shakingly good this bacon jam is. It is umami jam.  It is Ooo-Mommy jam.

Since every way I conceived to ‘splain this jam ends up sounded like a big, fat cliche in my brain (lip-smacking, mouth-watering, etc…) I thought a few anecdotes about the power of this Ooooh-Mommy, holy-cow, sweet-crappy-pappy-this-is-good jam might do the job.

  • While this jam was cooking, a neighbor (who we haven’t met in the three years we’ve lived here) came over to introduce himself.  He didn’t say as much, but I assume the smell drew him since he kept looking over at the stove where my pot of bacon jam bubbled away. He left as a friend.  He’ll be back. I’m sure of it.
  • I was chatting with my friend, Krysta, who lives on the opposite coast,  telling her how the scent of the cooking jam made me want to gnaw my own leg off at the ankle.  She realized she had the ingredients and decided to make it right then and there.  Within an hour she was drooling all over the place.  Ask her.  She’ll tell you.
  • When my beloved, The Evil Genius, tasted Bacon Jam for the first time, his eyes rolled back into his head and he said, “Ooooh- Mommy.”  While my husband is a food guy, those are reactions that he just doesn’t have. That equals spectacular food.
  • We had a grown-up slumber party last night (Okay, not just grown-ups.  Four adults and nine children. The kids were tucked in and it was party time, Foodie With Family style.  We were hard-core.  We broke out the Gilbert and Sullivan and sang along.  You haven’t played a drinking game until you have to take a sip every time someone in ‘Pirates of Penzance’ says ‘duty’!) This morning, breakfast was toasted slabs of fresh homemade bread smeared with bacon jam that we heated in a cast-iron frying pan next to sunny side up eggs.  Our friends and their kids have now moved into our house.

Speaking of these friends…  While we collectively munched our breakfasts, our dear Daytons, Pamela and Jon, helped us hash out just why a Bacon Jam topped piece of toast with a fried egg was superior to the traditional fare of bacon, eggs, and toast.  Jon observed that with Bacon Jam and fried egg on toast, you get the taste of bacon, egg, and toast in every bite. Because of his keen insight, he got double rations and the ability to choose the keyword the next time we all indulge in our Gilbert and Sullivan proclivities.

This post is special for one other reason.  The aforementioned Krysta  happens to have a pretty stylin’ food blog. You have read Evil Chef Mom, right? I really did tease her about the salty, sweet, meaty, maple-y, coffee-tinged dutch-oven-of-joy that I had just created, and she really did inventory her pantry and chill-chest and make her own batch.  We waxed rhapsodic over our new discovery.  And more than that, we decided that we both needed to post this at the very same time, because Bacon Jam turned us into giddy little teenage girls who buy and wear matching Johnny Depp* t-shirts. Hop on over to Evil Chef Mom and read Krysta’s reflections on the recipe.  She tried the recipe using Martha Stewart’s original instructions (using a slow-cooker.)

*Or somebody.  But probably Johnny Depp.  Because he could be the Bacon Jam of actors.  Or not.  But probably he is.

You can join the Bacon Jam Club, Krysta and I aren’t exclusive.  We want the whole world to know this joy.  Just be warned, once you try it, it’s like the mob. There’s no going back.

Bacon Jam (a.k.a. Oooh-Mommy Jam)

Scroll to the bottom for an easy-print version of this recipe!

Inspired by Martha Stewart and The Perfect Pantry

Yield: About 6 cups.  (You can easily halve this recipe.)

Ingredients:

  • 3 pounds bacon
  • 4 large yellow onions, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 8 cloves garlic, smashed with the flat side of a knife or a pan and peeled
  • 1 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 cup packed light-brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1 1/2 cups very strong brewed black coffee
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Cut the bacon slices into one inch strips.  Add the bacon to a Dutch oven over medium-high heat.  Cook the bacon, stirring frequently, until the bacon is browned.  Use a slotted spoon to transfer the bacon to a paper-towel lined plate.  Drain all but 2 tablespoons of the bacon drippings into a heat-proof jar with a tight-fitting lid.*

*Save the bacon drippings in the refrigerator.  That’s too much flavor to trash!

Place the Dutch oven back over the medium-high heat and add the onions and garlic.

Stir well and reduce heat to medium.  Continue to cook for about 8 minutes, or until the onions are mostly translucent.

Add the remaining ingredients, stir well, and drop heat again, this time to low.

Bring to a boil, stirring frequently, and boil hard for 2 minutes.  After 2 minutes, stir the browned bacon into the onions and liquid.

Simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally to make sure things aren’t sticking, adding 1/4 cup of water if it seems to be drying out. When the onions are meltingly soft and the liquid is thick and syrupy, remove the dutch oven from the heat and let stand for 5 minutes.

Transfer the contents of the Dutch oven to the work bowl of a food processor that has been fitted with a blade.  Fit the lid in place and pulse several times or until the Bacon Jam is a spreadable consistency.  Scrape into a jar (or jars) or a container with a tight fitting lid.

Store in the refrigerator for up to one month or the freezer for up to six months!

Can be served cold, room temperature or warmed.

I do believe that breakfast just doesn’t get much better than this…

5.0 from 17 reviews

Bacon Jam
Author: 
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 32
 
Salty, meaty, chewy, sweet, savoury, smoky, bacony goodness. Bacon is crisped and made into the ultimate breakfast spread with maple syrup, onions, coffee, brown sugar and pepper.
Ingredients
  • 3 pounds bacon
  • 4 large yellow onions, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 8 cloves garlic, smashed with the flat side of a knife or a pan and peeled
  • 1 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 cup packed light-brown sugar
  • ½ cup pure maple syrup
  • 1½ cups very strong brewed black coffee
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Instructions
  1. Cut the bacon slices into one inch strips. Add the bacon to a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Cook the bacon, stirring frequently, until the bacon is browned. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the bacon to a paper-towel lined plate. Drain all but 2 tablespoons of the bacon drippings into a heat-proof jar with a tight-fitting lid.*
  2. *Save the bacon drippings in the refrigerator. That’s too much flavor to trash!
  3. Place the Dutch oven back over the medium-high heat and add the onions and garlic. Stir well and reduce heat to medium. Continue to cook for about 8 minutes, or until the onions are mostly translucent. Add the remaining ingredients, stir well, and drop heat again, this time to low.
  4. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently, and boil hard for 2 minutes. After 2 minutes, stir the browned bacon into the onions and liquid.
  5. Simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally to make sure things aren’t sticking, adding ¼ cup of water if it seems to be drying out. When the onions are meltingly soft and the liquid is thick and syrupy, remove the dutch oven from the heat and let stand for 5 minutes.
  6. Transfer the contents of the Dutch oven to the work bowl of a food processor that has been fitted with a blade. Fit the lid in place and pulse several times or until the Bacon Jam is a spreadable consistency. Scrape into a jar (or jars) or a container with a tight fitting lid. Store in the refrigerator for up to one month or in the freezer for up to 6 months.
  7. Can be served cold, room temperature or warmed.
Notes
The bacon jam could take up to 3 hours to reduce to a syrupy consistency. Just stick with it!

Comments

  1. Jake Woollard says:

    I’m in the UK and I REALLY want to try this, but would you advise using smoked or unsmoked bacon?

    • Hi there, Jake! Definitely go with the smoked bacon. Over here, smoked bacon is our default when we say bacon. :-)

      • Jake Woollard says:

        Thanks…. I’ll let you know how I get on.

        • Paul Bacon says:

          Hey Jake,

          I hope you find something like American Bacon. I spent three months in Brighton two summers ago and I could never find
          any english bacon that compared to our American Bacon. What I found was not as fatty and therefore didn’t caramelize the
          same. I really couldn’t wait to get home to bacon I was used to. But, I sure enjoyed all the English milk products…. you guys
          know how to use milk for so many yummy things!! Never saw so many kinds of cheese and cream products…. very cool!!

  2. i am just starting my third batch. my neighbors think i’m a unicorn. this stuff is MAGIC!!!! love, love, love it. i mean, you can’t go wrong with bacon, but this is proof positive that God exists and that he created the pig for bacon jam.

  3. I just finished making this for Christmas breakfast. Of course, I can’t food process it until the morning. I can’t really taste the coffee and had to glug in extra syrup for mine, because our “sweet” onions were giant yellow-green balls of fire. Honestly, I couldn’t breathe the fumes of the onions until they were as close to carmel as sulfur can be.

    I’m soooo upset. I was waiting so long to get the opportunity to make this and I’m worried the outcome won’t be quite as scrumtrillescent due to the evil demon onions from hell.

  4. Absolutely delicious! One question though…I doubled this recipe and it took a ridiculously long time (13 hours) to reduce to the appropriate consistency. I bumped up the heat to medium, and it seemed to only minimally speed up the process. Any advice?

    • WOAH! 13 hours? I have no idea what was going on there. The longest it has ever taken me is three hours. The only suggestions I have are to boil the coffee/onion/blahblah mixture a little bit longer before adding the bacon back in and that ‘low’ one one burner can be different than another burner… For instance, I have 2 power burners, 2 standard burners and an ultra low simmer burner. I usually prepare this on a standard burner to keep it from scorching.

  5. My sister made this for my husband for Christmas, bacon is a recipe enhancer according to my husband. I must say this is the best thing I had ever had!

  6. Making my first batch now! I added the bacon back with the coffee, brown sugar, etc. I hope I didn’t mess it up too badly!

  7. The picture at the very beginning is itself, unadulterated food porn. I love. Headed to the store now to start my first batch of Bacon Jam. I as giddy as a school girl!

  8. I just recently came across this recipe as I am all about anything bacon :) Your picture had me drooling. As luck would have it I needed groceries and in checking the store site saw they had a good bacon at almost 50% off!! No excuses now!! Bought enough for a full recipe, but only made half. Until I know how frequently I’ll be using it, I don’t want copious amounts around that may go to waste. I can always make more, and double it then. I did substitute AlaGa syrup (a favorite among southerners) for the maple, and had to use dark brown sugar instead of light. If these made any major difference in taste, I wouldn’t know and would not hesitate to use these ingredients the next time.

    I don’t know how long it simmered, I didn’t time it. Just let it go until it had what I thought was the proper consistency. It was hard, I wanted so bad to do a spoonful for the jar, one for me, etc, but I didn’t. I did save a good bit at the end to inhale.

    Breakfast in the morning will be homemade bread slathered with bacon jam, and topped with a poached egg. Some Greek yogurt with strawberries, kiwi and blueberries.

  9. Susan (Cajun in Montana) says:

    I found this recipe today and made it today omg it is wonderful….I would change nothing it came out perfect. ONe suggestion that may help I rendered my bacon in a cast iron pot and once the bacon had cook for a few minutes on top of the stove I put it in a preheated oven at 400 degrees for about 20 minutes made it easy just checked on it. While waiting I was able to chop onions and get everything else measured out for the finale. Will be making this again only one question…can this be shipped out of town does it need constant refrigeration? Thanks so much

    • Hi Susan, Nice tip! I would say it needs constant refrigeration because of the meat/fat in it. Those can go rancid quickly~ And you’re welcome!

  10. How much does the recipe yield?

  11. Debbie Sanford says:

    This is a fantastic recipe. I made a couple of changes- just minor. I used malt vinegar instead of cider vinegar, dark instead of light brown sugar,1 teas. smoked paprika and 2 tbls. Worchestershire sauce. It was fabulous. I think it could be canned in 1/2 pint or jelly jars and processed in a pressure cooker the same way you would process canned meat or fish. Then the shelf life should be longer. I’m going to process a batch this way and I”ll let you know how it turns out.

    • Did you end up canning it as planned, Debbie? I intend to make small jars of this for my wedding favors and it will definitely need to be preserved. I’ve made the recipe before without preserving it (because, let’s be honest, it’s so good that it goes QUICKLY with my friends and family). I’m new to pressure canning though. Any tips/suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

  12. Did you know there are actually people who throw away their bacon grease? I find that appalling.

  13. You mentioned above that you don’t can this, but you do freeze it? Do you just freeze it in the mason jars? Thanks!

  14. joyce meek says:

    hi from western canada, can this jam also be processed in pressure canner, if so what is the pressure and for how long is it processed? Tasted it at a farmers market, awesome but leary of purchasing it if it is not processed. Weather here is around 95 – 100 degrees now thank you

    • Hi Joyce. I suspect it can be pressure canned, but I don’t know what pressure and the processing time as I have not had the recipe vetted by the proper authorities. I am content with keeping it in my freezer for now… :-)

  15. I saw somewhere you can only freeze for 1 month. Why not
    Longer? Wanted to make a couple of months before Christmas.
    Thanks

  16. I saw that you can freeze 1 month, why not
    longer. Was hoping to make a few months
    Before Christmas. thanks

  17. Hi, SUsan, Somewhere along in the comments, I read a post of REbecca’s that she thought it could be frozen up to three months, so that would give you more leeway for the holidays.

  18. Rebecca, Rebecca, Rebecca….
    What the What…I’ve never heard of bacon jam BUT I am now a believer. This stuff is great…on everything. My family loves it. I will be putting it on my cuban pork sandwiches (another one of your wonderful recipes) today. What goes better with pork than pork.
    Many thanks!

  19. This recipe worked out perfect !!!!! Looks just as pictured as a tasty as promised. It does take the three hours to reduce it so next time I will double the batch….the only changes I made were the onions….I live in WA State and I used Walla Walla Sweets intead of the yellow onions avaiable because this season they were very pungent…Also if you have an imersion stick blender use that instead of the food prossesor to make it spreadable….less clean up all around….Can’t wait to share this with my friends!!!!

  20. When you pressure cook it, is it a special canner
    or a normal pressure cooker??
    And how long will it last in the freezer?

    Thanks. ;))

  21. I have a relative who is allergic to onions. Is there a way to make this yummy jam without the onions?

  22. Marlea Ulrich says:

    OM FREAKIN” GOD !!!! This stuff is AMAZING !!! Smokey, sweet, savory, tangy, my taste buds are dancing like Tina Turner on stage !!! It moves across the tongue and you know there’s a party going on in your mouth !!! Haven’t tried it with toast and an egg yet, but I’m sure toast, eggs and bacon will never live up to the plain old tune ever again !!! Two thumbs and two big toes UP…Halleluja…amen !!!

  23. Is there any way…any way at all to make this without the onions or the coffee. One sister gets migraines and the onions set her off. She can have food flavored with onion but then we have to take the onion out because she can’t eat the onion itself. The other sister has dyslexia and dyscalculia, takes adderall to focus, and the caffeine will destroy her.

    HOWEVER, Bacon is its own food group around her and I’d love to hit them with this if I can!

    • Maybe try cooking the onions in a cheesecloth bag so you get the flavor without mixing the onions into the jam itself?

  24. I finally tried this the other day. It just sounded too good not to try my hand at.
    My kids and husband looked at me weird. I made it anyway. :-)
    It was much easier than anticipated but the flavor was not what I was expecting. It was good, just different. As my son said, “this would be awesome on a bbq sandwich” and I have to agree. I would not make this with breakfast but with some barbecued meat, it would be an A-M-A-Z-I-N-G topping!!
    Thanks so much for sharing this recipe Rebecca….I will be making this for ALL our cookouts this summer.
    *I didn’t have maple syrup so I replaced it with local honey.
    **More bacon will be added next time for sure! We L-O-V-E bacon!
    ***I had no problems getting it to cook down…took less than three hours for sure!

  25. Can anything be substituted for the coffee? Does the coffee flavor still come through or does it just blend in with the other flavors? Thanks.

  26. Would you recommend something as a replacement for the coffee?

  27. WOuld anyone suggest using regular thin sliced bacon or the thick cut variety? I’m always for using thick cut, but don’t want to if it would hurt the recipe…

    • As long as you go with the right poundage, you can use whichever bacon you’d like best. I usually go with the thin stuff here because of economy and save the thick stuff for when I am not blitzing it in the food processor, but that’s really neither here not there in regards to your question. If thick cut is your fave, use it- by all means!

  28. Hey, what sized cans would you suggest to use? I’m making it for a present for some family members and would like to know :)

  29. I’m not a great fan of bacon, but my brother-in-law is, so I’m making this for him for Christmas. It’s still cooking, but so far the liquid is tasting really nice, tangy, sweet, meaty, and deep, like a good barbecue sauce. Instead of water, I’ve been throwing in extra coffee and vinegar. There’s a nice coffee flavor to it because of that. I’ve also put in a little cayenne instead of black pepper, because my brother-in-law likes spicy things. I think he’s going to like this a lot.

  30. Josh Schilling says:

    This sounds like a really good recipe. I have two questions- Do you recommend any substitutes for the coffee. How have people shipped their jam? Just with ice packs? No issues with spoiling?

  31. I don’t have a Dutch oven. (In our house, a dutch oven is farting under the blankets and pinning your kid/spouse underneath). I do have a pan that looks similar to a Dutch oven. It is stainless steel, with a heavy bottom and high sides. the sides are thin. Will this work? Thanks!

  32. Eek! I think I like my definition of Dutch oven better :D

    Any pan large enough to hold the contents while they bubble should work fine. If the bottom is heavy, that’s even better so you can prevent scorching!

Trackbacks

  1. [...] a start, we’ll do what Rebecca of Foodie with Family suggested in this post: spread it thick on a good piece of bread then plop a poached egg with a runny yolk on [...]

  2. [...] this recipe (from Rebecca at Foodie with Family and Krysta from Evil Chef Mom, originally from Martha Stewart) Share This Post…You know you wanna [...]

  3. [...] week, I saw a link that Michael Ruhlman shared on Facebook.  It was for bacon jam that he saw on Twitter and he couldn’t stop thinking about it.  Then, I couldn’t stop [...]

  4. [...] been making “the rounds” on food blogs. And I watched all my friends make it – Rebecca, Krysta, Amy, Blythe, Paula (pictured on Facebook) – before I finally gave in and made a [...]

  5. [...] Source: Foodie with Family [...]

  6. [...] Burger Sliders on Hawaiian Rolls, with Bacon Jam and New York Cheddar Cheese. Burger [...]

  7. [...] first found the recipe while perusing through the foodiewithfamily blog and immediately flagged it as something I just had to try. I mean – really, what is not [...]

  8. [...] got the idea from Foodie with Family. I believe she got the idea from the Martha Stewart’s [...]

  9. [...] and Kari’s recipe for Bacon Jam is mildly adapted from Foodie With Family’s bacon jam recipe which she says is gently adapted from Martha Stewart’s recipe and uses The [...]

  10. [...] outside at a picnic table.  Contemplate the metaphysical and spiritual equivalent of smelling this [...]

  11. [...] times during the Year of Meat. It all started with bacon jam, an idea that sprouted after reading this brilliantly charming post by Rebecca. I made several versions of bacon jam, playing the sweet, the spicy, the onion of the jam with the [...]

  12. [...] I could probably make it cheaper, and then I would have more to give away. A quick search got me this recipe, which looked pretty good, and I was off and running. It is basically equal parts bacon and onions, [...]

  13. [...] Click to my site and scroll to the bottom for an easy-print version of this recipe! [...]

  14. [...] decided to make bacon jam puff pastry treats. I got some bacon jam from a pal of mine, and I think this is the recipe for bacon jam. When I run out of bacon jam, I will be making more of it from that recipe. What is not to love [...]

  15. [...] I’m certain this would be incredible: Bacon Jam. [...]

  16. neatnosh says:

    [...] and made bacon jam. No, really. I wanted to see if I could. And I did with the help of this recipe: http://www.foodiewithfamily.com/2011/01/17/bacon-jam-a-k-a-oooh-mommy-jam/. It was surprising and delicious, but so much work for so little jam. We enjoyed it on steak [...]

  17. [...] the link for the recipe from one of my favorite food blogs, foodiewith family–because why fix [...]

  18. […] well aware of her adoration of anything pork. So when I came across a recipe for Bacon Jam on Foodie with Family, it was pretty much inevitable that we try it out. Just looking over the ingredient list had me […]

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  20. […] Bacon Jam Adapted from Foodie with Family […]

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