Homemade Furikake |Japanese Rice Seasoning

The first order of business on this post just plain has to be pronunciation. Foo-ree-kah-kay. My boys, however, prefer to call it furry khaki. Why? Well, I assume it has something to do with being very silly boys.

Now that we’re all on the same page, let’s talk about what it is… Furikake is like the salt and pepper of Japan. It goes on bowls of rice, gets mixed into onigiri, sprinkled over noodles, on porridge and just about anything else that holds still long enough to get hit with it. This wanton flinging of furikake happens for an excellent reason; because it tastes great and delivers an instant explosion of umami to anything it tops. I find myself looking for more foods to cover with this distinctive seasoning that is briny and earthy with just a touch of seafood essence. If you’ve had it before, you know that there’s nothing to compare to the complete flavour added to dishes where this is present.

I’ll be honest. I’m fixated on furikake. I love this so much that I almost always make more rice than we’ll need in a meal so I can form rice balls to sprinkle with furikake for late night snacks. Sometimes I just open the jar to sniff it a little bit. It’s a weakness.

So what is it exactly? In it’s basic form -the form I’m giving you today- it is toasted sesame seeds, sea salt, nori, bonito flakes** and an optional pinch of sugar*.

*Most commercially available furikakes contain added MSG and preservatives.

**Bonito flakes are dried, paper-thin shaved flakes of tuna. They add a rich seafood taste to the furikake. If you have trouble finding them, you can purchase them through this link . (Full disclosure: This link will take you to Amazon.com. If you purchase the bonito flakes, I will receive an itty bitty commission. )

There are many, many versions of it sold, and just as many, if not more, versions of it made in homes but what I’m giving you today is a good basic leaping off point for adding that little special something to your meals or snacks. We start with raw sesame seeds here, but if all you can find is toasted sesame seeds, simply skip the toasting step and proceed from that point forward.

Do make this, though. Just do. I can’t be the only one who obsesses over these things. I refuse to think that is possible. I need some company on my wacky little furikake island, people.

Homemade Furikake |Japanese Rice Seasoning

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 5 minutes

Yield: One generous cup of furikake.

Furikake: the salt and pepper of Japan. This crunchy, salty, nutty, earthy, briny topping that tastes slightly of seafood is a great all-purpose seasoning for rice, seafood, snacks, and more.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup raw sesame seeds
  • 1 teaspoon to 1 tablespoon sea salt, to taste
  • 3 sheets nori
  • 3 heaping tablespoons bonito flakes
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar, optional

Instructions

Heat a dry, heavy-bottomed skillet over a medium high burner.

Pour in the sesame seeds and shake to distribute evenly over the surface of the skillet.

Toast, shaking occasionally, until the seeds are fragrant and begin making little popping sounds.

Immediately pour the seeds into a dry, clean bowl to cool and stir in the sea salt. Allow to cool completely before proceeding.

Use kitchen shears or clean, dry scissors to cut the nori into 1-inch strips. Stack the strips and cut cross-wise into very thin strips over the bowl of sesame seeds.

Use the kitchen shears again to roughly cut up the bonito flakes.

Add the sugar (if using) and stir all ingredients together, then transfer to a jar with a tight fitting lid.

This is ready to use immediately but can be stored in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight for up to two months.

http://www.foodiewithfamily.com/2011/08/09/homemade-furikake-japanese-rice-seasoning/

 

 

Comments

  1. says

    I LOVE furikake, so you’re not alone! I usually have a jar of it in my pantry. I really like it with dried shiso. Hmm… now I think I’m going to have to make some rice.

  2. says

    Always loved Japanese food. This one looked so fresh and healthy. Seems pretty easy to make.. Wonder if I can get some Nori and Bonito tonight…

    • says

      Oh yes there’s nothing better then Furikake on fresh Gohan except a cold spring water bath on a hot summer day in Japan drinking cold Sake and Asahi with a Clan of Yakuza friends in the remote city of Hiratsuka !!!

  3. says

    Bev- Pull up a chair :-)

    Pamela- No. It’s not, but you can still have furikake.

    jkru- I know. It’s habit forming like that, isn’t it?

    Lonnie- Did you get some?

    Mrs. C- Thank you! I hope you get a chance to try it.

  4. Deb says

    You’ve made a believer out of me! I can’t wait to try this, but I’m going to use the Himalayan pink salt I got from Sustainable Sourcing https://secure.sustainablesourcing.com. The flavor is so much better than regular salt!

    The plane will be departing for The Island in just a few hours! Let’s go!

  5. deniseinark says

    Thank you, thank you, thank you for this post. The asian stores are far on the other side of town, and this stuff runs about $4 a bottle. Just about the right price for seasoning, but DH sprinkles it into his hand and eats it just like that. If our grown kids come for a visit and find anything that happened to have been left over, they immediately snarf the last of it. Now I can afford to have a large enough quantity that there’s a chance it will always be in the cabinet. When you factor in the “no msg or preservatives” part, it’s pretty darned perfect. In fact, smaller jars may find their way into the Christmas stockings of those who will most appreciate them.

  6. Debbye says

    Making Poke for my folks 50th Wedding Anniversary party…and this is my missing ingredient! It’s got to be much better homemade! Thanks so much for sharing your obsession with us food minions!

  7. says

    Furikake rules! I came here to find a recipe because I don’t like the sugar in the commercial stuff. I will be making some with bonito, and some with powdered shrimp. I anticipate that it will be awesome. (Packing my bags to join you on Furikake Island)

Trackbacks

  1. [...] Originally Posted by kgirl Wow. Thanks for sharing! Would not have thought of that! But, then, we dont have seaweed here, either… It's dried seaweed (Nori) like the stuff they make sushi with. It comes in little bottles or packets like spice and you sprinkle it on. Mainstream grocery stores often have it in the Asian food sections its called Furikake. Here is a link to a recipe. Homemade Furikake Recipe | Japanese Rice Seasoning | Foodie With Family [...]

  2. [...] Furikake is a dry Japanese condiment meant to be sprinkled on top of rice. It typically consists of a mixture of dried and ground fish, sesame seeds, chopped seaweed, sugar, and salt. Outside Japan, furikake can be found in most Asian groceries (near the katsuobushi) or in the ethnic food aisle of some major supermarkets. You can find a great recipe for homemade furikake on one my favorite new blogs, foodie with family. [...]

  3. [...] Furikake is a dry Japanese condiment meant to be sprinkled on top of rice. It typically consists of a mixture of dried and ground fish, sesame seeds, chopped seaweed, sugar, and salt. Outside Japan, furikake can be found in most Asian groceries (near the katsuobushi) or in the ethnic food aisle of some major supermarkets. You can find a great recipe for homemade furikake on one my favorite new blogs, foodie with family. [...]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Current ye@r *