Basic Chicken Stock and Asian Chicken Stock: Printer Friendly Versions!

Basic Chicken Stock

This stock is the bees-knees for use in soups, risotto, plain rice, sauces and any other places you need a good, basic chicken stock.

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds chicken trimmings (backs, necks, bones, fat, skin, and cleaned chicken feet, if available. Above all, make sure you have many uncooked bones in the mix.)
  • 2 large carrots, scrubbed and broken in half
  • 2 stalks of celery, scrubbed and broken in half
  • 1 large onion, halved and peeled
  • a handful of parsley stems (save the leaves for use in other dishes)
  • 10 black peppercorns
  • water

Add the chicken to the stockpot and cover with cold, fresh water by four inches.  Bring to a simmer -when an occasional bubble breaks the surface of the steaming liquid, but it is not boiling- and skim any foam or impurities that rise to the surface of the liquid.  After 30 minutes of skimming and simmering, add the remaining ingredients to the pot and cover partially.  Simmer for at least 4 hours but up to 10  hours, adding additional boiling water if the liquid drops below the level of the solids in the pot.  Remove from the heat and fish out as many solids as you can get with a pair of tongs, transferring them to a bowl.  Position a fine mesh strainer, or a colander lined with cheese cloth or a clean tea towel over a large bowl or another stockpot.  Pour the stock through the strainer.  Add the solids that you removed to the strainer and press with the back of a wooden spoon to squeeze out as much stock and flavor as you can.  Discard the remaining solids.

Cover the stock and chill until the fat rises to the surface.  Skim off the fat.  (You can store the chicken fat in the freezer to use to make the best roasted potatoes you’ll ever taste!)

You can store the stock in the refrigerator, tightly covered, for up to 5 days.  If you wish to store it longer, you can transfer to smaller containers and freeze for much longer.

If you, like me, are a canning maniac and want to go that extra step, reboil the stock, and pour the boiling stock into clean canning jars.  Screw on new two-piece lids and process in a pressure canner at 10 pounds of pressure for 25 minutes.  And if you want more details on just how to do that, let me know.  I’m happy to share!

Asian Chicken Stock

This stock is delicious in Asian-style noodle or dumpling soups or just sipped by itself.  And I can’t think of much that I enjoy more than a piping hot bowl of jook or congee made with this stock.

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds of chicken trimmings (Preferably mostly feet and necks, but you can use any combination of bones, meat and skin that you can find.)
  • 1 head of garlic, intact, but rubbed to remove the papery exterior
  • 1 (2-inch) piece of fresh ginger
  • optional, 2 fresh chile peppers (jalapeno, habanero, Thai, etc…)
  • water

Add the chicken to the stockpot and cover with cold, fresh water by four inches.  Bring to a simmer (when an occasional bubble breaks the surface of the steaming liquid, but it is not boiling.) and skim any foam or impurities that rise to the surface of the liquid.  After 30 minutes of skimming and simmering, add the garlic, ginger and chile peppers (if using), partially cover the pot and simmer for at least four more hours, but up to 10 hours, adding additional boiling water if the liquid drops below the level of the solids in the pot.  Remove from the heat and fish out as many solids as you can get with a pair of tongs, transferring them to a bowl.  Position a fine mesh strainer, or a colander lined with cheese cloth or a clean tea towel over a large bowl or another stockpot.  Pour the stock through the strainer.  Add the solids that you removed to the strainer and press with the back of a wooden spoon to squeeze out as much stock and flavor as you can.  Discard the remaining solids.

Cover the stock and chill until the fat rises to the surface.  Skim off the fat.  (You can store the chicken fat in the freezer to use in fried rice or frying dumplings.)

You can store the stock in the refrigerator, tightly covered, for up to 5 days.  If you wish to store it longer, you can transfer to smaller containers and freeze for much longer.

If you’d like to can this stock, follow the directions given above in the Basic Chicken Stock recipe.