Homemade Tortilla Chips Two Ways

Sometimes a gal just needs something good and greasy and salty to make her feel everything is right with the world.  This past weekend was one of those moments.  With the vehic-ules on the semi-permanent fritz, not being able to grocery shop in person (“No, honey.  I know chocolate chips are expensive, but please get them anyway… And yes, we DO need more milk.”), the kids having just recovered from not one, but two pernicious Spring bugs, and a host of other minor annoyances I needed a little bit of pampering.  And I don’t mean Pampers.  I’ve seen enough of THOSE for quite some time, thankyouverymuch.  Not that I’d pay that much for diapers, mind you, but Pampers in the diaper sense as Bandaids are to adhesive bandages.  I mean to say that I needed something that was good for my soul if not for my middle which is a lost cause at this point anyway after carrying and birthing five baby boys.  And -whatever this may say about my imperfections as a human- there is nothing like some fabulous deep fried goodies to lift my spirits.

Because the trips to the store lately have been limited (as in non-existant) I’ve been relying on hitting up my freezer and pantry to feed the beasts (and here I refer to all of us…  I have no ‘girly’ appetite.  I can eat most men under the table.)  I’ve been doing a pretty good job of it and my deep-fried endeavours were no exception.  Whenever I get to town, I reflexively stock up on whatever tortillas I can find most cheaply.  Last time the 28 ounce/ 36 count packages of white corn tortillas at Aldi happened to be the cheapest tortillas on the block.  So I bought 8 packages.  I stuck them in the freezer for a rainy day.  I was using them up bit by bit when my craving struck.  I sacrificed an entire package of the tortillas to make chips for my crew and the family members who visited over the weekend.  Believe me when I tell you this was not overkill.  There were no chips left in the bowl.  If you’ve been lucky enough to eat homemade tortilla chips before this will not shock you.  If, however, you’ve never known the hot, crispy, wonderful phenomenon that is a homemade tortilla chip then you’re in for a treat.

One of the many nice things about making your own chips is the ability to flavor them in any direction you should choose.  There is a small but very vocal contingent around here who prefers their tortilla crisps fried lightly and doused liberally with cinnamon sugar.  The vast majority of the house (including ME!) prefers them fried crackling crispy and dusted generously with a spicy blackened fish seasoning and coarse sea salt.  You see where I’m going with this?  It’s easy to make the exact chips you want.  On a salt-restricted diet?  Leave the salt off entirely and top with whatever spice blend flicks your Bic.  How about cinnamon/nutmeg/powdered sugar?  Or cheese powder, or Old Bay, or Lawry’s Seasoning Salt, or nori flakes and sea salt.  The sky’s the limit!

And let’s talk pocketbook for a second.  Homemade chips are more filling than the variety you get in a bag, so you eat less of them.  And at a whopping $1.25 for 28 ounces of white corn tortillas we’re looking at the homemade equivalent weight of 1 1/2 of the cheapest pounder bags of pre-made tortilla chips known to man.  When you add in the flavorings and oil for the deep frying  (“WHAT? Did she say deep-fry?  I don’t do deep-frying.” Hang on and stick with me.  It’s not all that scary. I’ll help you out.  That’s what I’m here for.) we’re up to about $2.00 for the finished batch of chips.  This is before you even factor in the fact that the homemade tortilla chips are  infinitely tastier than the purchased variety.

Yes.  I said this recipe deep-fries.  I know there are a lot of folks out there who are seriously worried about deep-frying food for a multitude of reasons.  Among them:

  1. Danger:  If done properly, deep-frying is no more dangerous than any other technique in the kitchen.  With a properly sized DRY stable pan on a level stove with the proper amount of oil and no kids playing hacky sack in the room you’re as safe as houses.  I emphasize the word ‘dry’ because a drop of water in your oil (whether it be from a freshly washed pan or a pair of tongs with a lingering bit of water clinging to it) can wreak havoc with heating oil and cause popping like you wouldn’t believe.  But if you observe those cautions and proceed cautiously you’ll be fine!
  2. Expense:  This is a bit trickier.  There is no doubt that oil is expensive these days.  All I can say is that I generally plan to do at least two or three frying sessions with each batch of oil I dedicate to deep-frying.  Of course, you need to do some planning with that.  If you once fry fish in oil, it’s pretty much only good for frying fish or the ubiquitous chips.  If, however, you start the frying party with tortilla chips or French fries or something else intrinsically mild in flavor and at a moderate cooking temperature it should be good for at least one or two more uses if you strain it after using and store it properly.
  3. Health:  Well yes.  You probably don’t want to eat this every day of the week or even every week.  But in moderation it is a soul-satisfying way to cook.  Add this to the wine/cheese/carb/egg/beer/etc… bogeyman list.  If you eat a steady diet of it you’re pretty well assured of dropping before your time.  If you make it an occasional treat to be savored you’ll not only not die instantly, but you’ll appreciate it more.
  4. Mess:  There’s not a whole lot of getting around this.  Deep-frying can be messy if done wrong and sometimes even if done right. If you have all your ducks in a row before starting to fry you’ll have a much easier job of cleaning up.  Some mess is inevitable, but since you’re not eating this real often (see ‘Health’ bullet point above) the small mess you incur is probably worth it to you.

The truth of the matter is that it isn’t the healthiest, tidiest, cheapest, least-fraught-with-potential-for-injury dish to make (Geez.  Do I know how to sell my recipes or what?  I have to be truthful.  I’ve said it before.  My moral compass if firmly pointed toward ‘Honest’.) but sometimes I just don’t care.  I want a chip, dangit, and I’ll be darned if I’m not going to eat one.  Throw some caution to the wind with me and you’ll wind up, at least temporarily, blissed out with a bowl full of the best chips known to mankind.  I’d say that’s worth the risk every once in a while.

I’ve shown you our two favorite toppings below, but go nuts and experiment with this.  Play with your food a little bit.  Worst case scenario is foisting a failed batch on your grateful dogs.  I can almost promise you they won’t mind.

For a printer-friendly, photo-free version of this recipe, click here!

Homemade Tortilla Chips

Ingredients:

  • White corn tortillas
  • at least 2 1/2 cups Neutral oil for frying (like Canola, Corn or Vegetable oil)
  • Optional for topping; salt, sugar, spices.

Cut white corn tortillas into wedges of desired size.

I used a 28 ounce/ 36 count package of white corn tortillas.  You can do this with flour tortillas, too, but they cook a wee bit faster, so adjust your cooking times accordingly.

I used a 28 ounce/ 36 count package of white corn tortillas. You can do this with flour tortillas, too, but they cook a wee bit faster, so adjust your cooking times accordingly.

Sometimes these little tricksters like to stick together.  If you fan them out before cutting them they'll come apart more easily.

Sometimes these little tricksters like to stick together. If you fan them out before cutting them they'll come apart more easily.

Halvsies...

Halvsies...

This makes me think of Dr. Seuss's 'Fox in Socks' where the main character says, "You can make a quick trick brick stack."  There's no good reason for the association other than making a stack of something.  I'm just sharing too much information.

This makes me think of Dr. Seuss's 'Fox in Socks' where the main character says, "You can make a quick trick brick stack." There's no good reason for the association other than making a stack of something. I'm just sharing too much information.

I like to tip my perfect towers of tortillas over into a pile.  It makes me feel like I'm a rebel.

I like to tip my perfect towers of tortillas over into a pile. It makes me feel like I'm a rebel.

Place oil in a good-sized, heavy-bottomed, completely dry pan over medium to medium-high heat (For 2 1/2 cups oil you should use a high-sided pan that has a capacity of at least 2 1/2 quarts).

tortillachips6

Set your pan over a nice medium to medium high flame or heat.

Set your pan over a nice medium to medium high flame or heat.

You should not fill the pan above 1/3 full for safety’s sake.

This is about the depth you're going for.  You sure wouldn't want more than this because it might lean toward boiling over.  But if you put a little less in it wouldn't harm anything.

This is about the depth you're going for. You sure wouldn't want more than this because it might lean toward boiling over. But if you put a little less in it wouldn't harm anything.

Watch the oil.  When it starts getting little lines in it it is becoming hot.  Test the readiness of the oil by inserting the corner of one of the tortillas into the oil.

This oil is not ready yet.  See how there are very few -if any- bubbles licking around the edge of the tortilla?  That's a dead giveaway, in the absence of a thermometer, that your oil needs to heat longer before you fry with it.

This oil is not ready yet. See how there are very few -if any- bubbles licking around the edge of the tortilla? That's a dead giveaway, in the absence of a thermometer, that your oil needs to heat longer before you fry with it.

If many bubbles form quickly around the tortilla and rise to and break the surface then your oil is ready to go.

This is how your chips should look as they cook.  There should be lots of bubbles coming around the edges of your chips and the chips themselves should be moving (but not violently) in the oil.

This is how your chips should look as they cook. There should be lots of bubbles coming around the edges of your chips and the chips themselves should be moving (but not violently) in the oil.

Stir these little fellas around to make sure they're not sticking together.  Your tongs will do the job admirably here.

Stir these little fellas around to make sure they're not sticking together. Your tongs will do the job admirably here.

Your oil should never smoke when preparing these chips, but steam should come from the surface of the oil.  Your nose will tell you the difference.

Carefully slide the tortilla wedges into the oil. Do not throw them into the oil.  You stand a much higher chance of splattering oil on yourself or your stove if you toss in the tortillas.  Add several tortilla wedges to the pan at a time, taking care not to overload the pan.

This is just about the right amount of chips to put in here.  I wouldn't go with too many more.

This is just about the right amount of chips to put in here. I wouldn't go with too many more.

If you overload it you both lower the temperature of the oil, which makes your food take longer to cook/absorb more oil, and raise the level of the oil which increases the risk of boiling oil spilling over the sides of your pan.  THAT would be a bad thing!

If you desire chips that are not super crispy, remove to a paper towel or newspaper lined dish after about 1 minute.

This is the slightly crispy, slighty chewy lighter chip that my cinnamon/sugar lovers adore.  This is after about one minute of frying time.

This is the slightly crispy, slighty chewy lighter chip that my cinnamon/sugar lovers adore. This is after about one minute of frying time.

Can you smell the cinnamon sugar?  Mmmm.  Commence drooling.

Can you smell the cinnamon sugar? Mmmm. Commence drooling.

I had two children hanging off my legs while this picture was taken.  They were not paragons of patience and I can't say I blamed them.

I had two children hanging off my legs while this picture was taken. They were not paragons of patience and I can't say I blamed them.

If you desire crispier chips keep frying them for another minute or so.  Keep in mind that the color of the chips and degree of crispness will increase as they cool on the paper towels.

This is how I like 'em.  Crispy and darker and salty and oooooooh baby.

This is how I like 'em. Crispy and darker and salty and oooooooh baby.

Your feel for the perfect time to remove your chips from the oil will improve as you continue.  If you botch the first batch or so just let them cool and toss them to the dogs.  They won’t care if the chips are overdone and they’ll be grateful for the treat.

As soon as the chips are on paper towels you should season them according to your tastes.  This is a job best done when hot.  Once the chips are cool they’ll lose the power to hold on to all those tasty things you’re shaking all over them.

Blackened fish seasoning.  Don't knock it 'til you've tried it.  It's amazing on chips and you can't buy THAT flavor bag of chips, can you?

Blackened fish seasoning. Don't knock it 'til you've tried it. It's amazing on chips and you can't buy THAT flavor bag of chips, can you?

The Evil Genius says he'd give up any food in the world except for salt.  And coffee.  And chocolate.  He's not real flexible I guess...

The Evil Genius says he'd give up any food in the world except for salt. And coffee. And chocolate. He says he'd rather die. That's why I love him. He knows how to prioritize.

Shortly after snapping this photo I ate the whole blessed batch of chips.

Shortly after snapping this photo I ate the whole blessed batch of chips.

Actually, I didn't eat them all.  Those kids can lay a world of hurt on food in very little time.  I got one solitary chip for all my trouble.  But oh what a chip it was!

Actually, I didn't eat them all. Those kids can lay a world of hurt on food in very little time. I got one solitary chip for all my trouble. But oh what a chip it was!

Serve while still warm for the ultimate homemade chip experience or store leftovers in a tightly closed container lined with a paper towel at room temperature.  If they soften a bit after storage, you can refresh their crispness by tossing them on a pan and into a 350°F oven for just a few minutes…  Remove and serve warm.

Of course, the possiblities for nacho-i-fying these are nearly endless.  You’d never eat a better nacho in your whole life, but these are good enough to eat naked.  The chips I mean.  Not you.  I’ll just eat them in my turtleneck and long pants.  Of course, if you want to eat these naked who am I to judge?  I wouldn’t recommend frying them naked, though…

Now about that oil.  DON’T THROW IT OUT!  Here’s what you do:

tortillachips-22

The fine mesh strainer is the key here...

The fine mesh strainer is the key here...

Pour the oil through the strainer...

Pour the oil through the strainer...

Cap it tightly and stash it somewhere cool and dark for the next fry-daddy go 'round.

Cap it tightly and stash it somewhere cool and dark for the next fry-daddy go 'round.

Comments

  1. Was looking for a homemade tortilla chip recipe and it brought up your website:-)We enjoy our homecooked items too. I bought a real good fiber soft taco shell and baked them today. Pretty yummy. I was kicking the idea of using different seasonings.

    Mainly just wanted to say I enjoyed your style of writing.

  2. Ethan Zimmerman says:

    I just wanted to say that you are ABSOLUTELY awesome!! I decided to prepare cuban pork, black beans and rice since I love the food so much. I found your site and it saved me a ton of hassle. I’ll try these chips next week… Happy New Year to you and your family…

  3. I tried a recipe where you bake them even though I really wanted them fried, they were terrible too chewy and couldnt get em salty at all. I tried yours today I thought they we’re great I think they improved the taste of my pico!

  4. “I emphasize the word ‘dry’ because a drop of water in your oil (whether it be from a freshly washed pan or a pair of tongs with a lingering bit of water clinging to it) can wreak havoc with heating oil and cause popping like you wouldn’t believe.”

    We made fried chicken last night, and we got a bit distracted so the oil got too hot. No big deal, just turn down the heat and wait for it go down, right? Nooo… Hubby o’mine decided that he should toss an ice cube into the 400 degree oil. O_O It made a decent mess splattering everywhere, but we evacuated the kitchen quickly enough that no humans got hit. I admit, it was actually kind of neat to watch!

    Thanks for the recipe. We are making pico for lunch, and Hubby decided he wants to try making homemade tortilla chips. I think that will be the last thing we make with this batch of oil, after frying up chicken last night and parsnips the night before that. We only fry stuff once (well, once for a few nights in a row to get our money’s worth out of the oil) every few months, but when we do it is certainly a lot of fun.

    We fry and store the strained oil in our dutch oven. Don’t know how good an idea that is, but it seems to work well enough since we only keep the oil for a few days.

  5. Rebecca says:

    The chips were fantastic! My fave was with Lawry’s as seasoning.

    We also decided to try just one tortilla worth of chips made in the chewy cinnamon-sugar style that you described, though it didn’t sound like the kind of chip we would like. We were wrong. Ended up making fully half of our chips as chewy cinnamon-sugar deliciousness!

  6. made this recipe (delicious by the way) found some great seasoning to try as well though; powdered cheese (when you can find it mixed with fajitas seasoning——-Doritos anyone?

  7. I am experienced in the kitchen, but for a beginner cook you are great! This is exactly how I would explain things to my daughter when it comes to safety around hot oil. :)
    Fixing to try the tortilla chips…

  8. angeline says:

    Hi, I just found your recipe and will be making it before the end of the week.
    sounds like it is going to be yummy.
    will let you know.
    Thanks for sharing
    angeline

  9. That was a fun read. My girlfriend and I have been experimenting around with homemade salsa, so naturally homemade chips made the list of things to try. I suspect that I had my oil a tad on the hot side and some of my chips ended up a little to crisp on the edges and tender in the middle. I’m guessing that 350-360 is about right. And just to put it out there. We’re both going try the naked thing in the kitchen tonight.

  10. I read that if you bake them first for say 45 sec – 1 min and then fry, they absorb less oil. not sure how this tastes but that was from madehow.com

  11. instead of using wheat flour how about a combo of maize flour and corn flour ?

Trackbacks

  1. [...] honor of National Tortilla Day, I’m posting a link to a recipe for homemade tortilla chips. That’s right, you heard me; HOMEMADE TORTILLA [...]

  2. [...] I have just a couple of other thoughts to share about this recipe.The Creole Seasoning is wonderful to have on hand for recipes that call for it, to be sure, but we like to use it on other things, too. For instance, we love it on popcorn or homemade tortilla chips. [...]

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